Monday, March 23, 2015

Presentation on LGBT Outreach at SNCA

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro enjoys the reputation for supporting an inclusive campus “where there is visible and meaningful representation of the diversity present in the wider community.” During this year’s annual conference of the Society of North Carolina Archivists (SNCA) held in Greenville, NC from March 11th to 13th, Stacey Krim from the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) presented on how the department is contributing to the University’s diversity mission through archival outreach to UNCG’s LGBT community.

In the presentation titled, “Outreach to the Invisible: Archivists as Advocates to the LGBTQ Community,” Krim discussed the benefits of advocacy work as a platform for targeted educational outreach and collection development. A Safe Zone Ally since 2008, she has been heavily involved with training relating to the needs of LGBT students and staff, bringing this initiative with her when she began working in SCUA in 2011. Taking inspiration from University Archive’s UNCG African American history outreach, Krim began the development of a UNCG LGBTQ history presentation.

Finding historical records relating to UNCG’s history on the topic was challenging. Although twelve percent of the UNCG student body self-identifies as not being gender or sex conforming (making them one of the largest minority groups on campus), fear of discrimination has kept the LGBT community virtually invisible in the historical record. In fact, the first officially “out” student at UNCG is not documented until 1992, a century after the opening of the institution. After several months of research, enough information was discovered to present an hour long UNCG LGBT history presentation, the debut of which was at the first meeting of the UNCG LGBT Alumni Group during Homecoming in 2012. Since then, this presentation has been requested several times each semester, with supplementary material posted on the University Archives social media outlets.

The outcome of Krim’s outreach to UNCG’s LGBT students and alumni has been wholly positive. The presentation is a staple for UNCG Safe Zone continuing education. Additionally, Krim has collaborated with UNCG’s Queer Student Union in the recreation of a controversial exhibit from 2002 featuring LGBT African American authors. Most importantly, this outreach raises the visibility of SCUA’s primary source materials and promotes the value University Libraries places on supporting diversity and inclusion on campus.

Monday, March 16, 2015

UNCG Archives trending on Tumblr!

The UNCG Archives Tumblr is currently featured as one of the Trending Blogs on the popular social media site Tumblr. We use our Tumblr to share photos, videos, and other content related to UNCG history and the collections and work of the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives. In the last three days alone, the UNCG Archives Tumblr has gained 768 new followers.

Our most popular post from the past month was a photograph from the Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project. The photo depicts African American WACs (Women’s Army Corps) standing in formation during basic training at Fort Des Moines, Iowa, in April 1943.

If you wish to follow the UNCG Archives Tumblr, you can do so by clicking the Follow button on our page. You can also follow via RSS feed using any RSS feed reader.

Friday, February 27, 2015

Shakespeare Exhibit


The UNCG sponsored series, The Globe and the Cosmos, is a year-long celebration of William Shakespeare and Galileo Galilei on the 450th anniversary of their respective births. It is a collaborative project that brings artists and scholars to campus and taps into the knowledge and talent of its faculty, students, and staff. The celebration also draws on the university’s holdings of art and rare and unique books to highlight the genius and humanity of both Shakespeare and Galileo. These works reflect the continued impact of these two men on scholarly research, creative work, and the ways we all imagine the world.

With strong holdings in the works of William Shakespeare, Special Collections and University Archives at UNCG’s University Libraries has mounted an exhibit that exclusively focused on the Bard. The exhibit, “That in Black Ink My Love May Still Shine Bright:” Selections from Five Centuries of Printed Works of William Shakespeare, seeks to illustrate Shakespeare’s impact on the history of western print culture. Additionally, the exhibit reveals the Library’s own active collecting of Shakespeare since the university’s founding.

To best view the exhibit, it is recommended that visitors begin with the two horizontal glass exhibit cases to the left as you enter the Hodges Reading Room. Moving in a clock-wise direction, visitors will view printed works in five horizontal exhibits cases and then end the tour by examining the contents of two large vertical cases that stand on either side of the Reading Room’s main entrance.

The first two exhibits cases contain works that provide the visitor with a glimpse of the print revolution that was sweeping Early Modern England. With rising literacy rates and a flourishing book trade, Shakespeare’s plays and poetry were purchased and read in large numbers. On display is a wonderful facsimile of a 1609 quarto of his sonnets and a complete 1623 First Folio, both found in Special Collections and University Archives. In the accompanying vertical case, there are two of the earliest print editions found in the exhibit. The case contains a 1632 copy of Richard the Third and a beautiful and complete 1685 Fourth Folio.

The display in the next two exhibit cases is intended to transport the visitor to the 19th and 20th centuries and reveal Shakespeare’s revered place within the English speaking world. The 1850 edition of the complete works of Shakespeare is a scholarly edition that contains an essay on his genius. These editions were intended to be used for educational pursuits. In the adjoining exhibit, the visitor will view examples of Shakespeare’s works produced by high-end publishing houses such as: Kelmscott Press, Doves Press, and Cranach Press. These works were collected for both their intricate design and content.

The works found in the final two vertical cases are wonderful examples of how book artists and custom binders of the late 20th century continue to turn to Shakespeare for inspiration. The works of Ronald King and Circle Press are found in the first case. Please note the provocative custom binding design of Antony & Cleopatra by Monique Lallier. In the last case, the visitor has the opportunity to view the breathtaking woodcuts by Leonard Baskin (Gehenna Press) and Claire Van Vliet (Theodore Press).

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

C-SPAN2 Book TV Program features Women Veterans Historical Project and WWI Pamphlets

C-SPAN2 Book TV visited Greensboro and made a trip to Special Collections and University Archives. 

Beth Ann Koelsch, Curator of the Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project (WVHP) and  Keith Gorman, Head of Special Collections and University Archives were featured on C-Span2 Book TV in February, 2015.

Koelsch showcased a selection of books by and about women in the military including self-published memoirs, cartoon books, and recruiting brochures.Gorman discussed about how the special collection of WWI pamphlets illustrated how propaganda was used throughout the course of the "Great War."

You can watch the program at this link: http://www.c-span.org/video/?324062-1/book-tv-greensboro-north-carolina

Why do archives matter to you?

The Society of American Archivists (SAA) is seeking input from researchers and others who use and enjoy archives, like those we have here at UNCG. They're seeking comments or testimonials on why archives matter to you!!

If you're willing to share a short statement about why archives matter to you (and you're willing to let us share that statement with the folks at SAA), please comment on this blog post or email us at scua@uncg.edu. It can be anything from a short and sweet comment on something interesting you learned the archives to a lengthier story about archival research you've done. We look forward to hearing from you!!

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Upcoming Event - LGBT History of UNCG Presentation

***Due to adverse weather, this presentation will be rescheduled. We'll share the new date and time as soon as it's available.***

Where: Virginia Dare Room, Alumni House
When: Tuesday, February 24th from 12:30-1:30

Although our University enjoys the benefits of a culture promoting equality and inclusivity, UNCG’s reputation for embracing diversity as an educational foundation was constructed over decades by student and staff advocacy. Among the more hidden stories of Civil Rights struggles at UNCG is that of the formation of a university-acknowledged student organization for LGBTQ students. 

As part of the Safe Zone Lunch and Learn Series, Stacey Krim will be discussing the LGBT history of UNCG on Tuesday, February 24 from 12:30-1:30 at the Alumni House's Virginia Dare Room.


Monday, January 26, 2015

Archiving UNCG's Online History

"It might seem, and it often feels, as though stuff on the Web lasts forever, for better and frequently for worse: the embarrassing photograph, the regretted blog (more usually regrettable not in the way the slaughter of civilians is regrettable but in the way that bad hair is regrettable). No one believes any longer, if anyone ever did, that “if it’s on the Web it must be true,” but a lot of people do believe that if it’s on the Web it will stay on the Web. Chances are, though, that it actually won’t."

In her recent New Yorker article "The Cobweb: Can the Internet be Archived?," writer Jill Lepore explores the important work of archivists, librarians, and organizations like the Internet Archive in preserving and providing continual access to web content. Her article coincides with a concerted effort in University Archives to proactively document the University's online history. As of January 2015, UNCG is officially a partner member of  the Internet Archive's service Archive-It.

Archive-It is a subscription web archiving service from the Internet Archive that helps organizations to harvest, build, and preserve collections of digital content. With Archive-It, partner members can collect, catalog, and manage their collections of archived content with 24/7 access and full text search available for their use as well as their patrons. Content is made available through the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine. Also, we in University Archives can link to archived websites using our online collection finding aids.

A screenshot of UNCG's homepage in 1997
Our web archiving work is just beginning, but already a number of key websites have been collected using the Archive-It tool. You can see the sites we've archived on our Archive-It member page. Pages captured as of January 26th include the primary website related to the 2015 search for our next Chancellor, the web-based publications of course bulletins that don't exist in print, the websites for a number of key administrative bodies on campus (Board of Trustees, Faculty Senate, and Staff Senate), and websites for a number of campus departments. In the future, we plan to archive the University's main social media accounts, websites of many student groups and organizations, and other online content related to the current work of the University.

University Archives is tasked with documenting UNCG's history, from its founding until today. Today, the University's web presence is a key part of that history. This new and exciting partnership with the Internet Archive and Archive-It helps us ensure that our current online history is as accessible to scholars as paper records from 50 or 100 years ago are.