Monday, September 26, 2016

War & Peace Imagined Celebrates Lev Aronson, featuring Internationally-Renowned Cellist, Lynn Harrell



University Libraries UNCG and the UNCG College of Visual and Performing Arts is collaborating to make December 2016 a spectacular month for music fans. As many of you may know, the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections & University Archives at #UNCG is home to the largest single holding of cello music-related materials in the world, and every few years, we celebrate one of the musicians represented in our collection. This year’s campus theme is "War & Peace Imagined," an exploration of war and peace through the arts and humanities. Therefore, it is most fitting that we celebrate the musical legacy of cellist, Lev Aronson.

Lev Aronson is remembered as a distinguished cellist, teacher, and survivor of the Holocaust. With his family forced from their home in Latvia during World War I and losing five years of his life to the camps of World War II, Aronson endured one of the darkest times in human history, surviving these events to bring beauty to the world through music. Among Aronson’s many students is internationally acclaimed cellist, Lynn Harrell.

We are sponsoring a concert (Dec. 2, 2016) and recital (Dec. 3, 2016) featuring Lynn Harrell. The information is available below and tickets are on sale now:

Ernest Bloch Hebraic Rhapsody for Solo Cello and Orchestra

When: Friday, December 2, 2016, 7:30 pm
Where: UNCG Auditorium

The UNCG Symphony Orchestra will accompany the world-renowned cellist as he performs Ernest Bloch's passionate and exotic work, Schelomo: Rhapsody for Solo Cello and Orchestra. Crafted in faith and misery, Schelomo premiered 100 years ago as part of Bloch's Jewish Cycle. This will be one piece in a larger concert from the UNCG Symphony.

UPAS: Lynn Harrell, recital

When: Saturday, December 3, 2016, 8:00 pm
Where: Recital Hall
Tickets: $30 adult/$25 student/ $25 senior
Lynn Harrell will complete his UNCG residency with this recital of virtuosic works including those of Lev Aronson, Mr. Harrell's cello teacher. Lev Aronson, himself a cellist and composer, was interned in both a Nazi Concentration Camp and a Russian Labor Camp. He eventually made it to the United States where he became the Principal Cellist of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and a beloved teacher of many successful cellists.
Program:
Sonata in G major (edited by Lev Aronson), Henry Eccles

Cello Sonata in C major, op. 119, Sergei Prokofiev
Cello Sonata, Claude Debussy
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Introduction, Theme and Variations, op. 82, no. 2 (arr. Gregor Piatigorsky), Franz Schubert
Cello Suite no. 3 in C major, BWV 1009, J.S. Bach 

Monday, August 22, 2016

Hop into History!

On Thursday, September 15 from 5pm until 7pm, archivists from UNCG will be at Gibb’s Hundred Brewing Company in Downtown Greensboro to launch the new monthly "Hop into History
 series with an exhibit on the local civil rights landscape in the 1950s and 1960s.



Come see the typewriter used by one of the first African American students to enroll at UNCG in Fall 1956, a scrapbook created by Curly Harris (the manager of Woolworth’s during the 1960 sit ins), a flyer distributed by students leading a boycott of segregated businesses on Tate Street in 1963, materials from the Black Power Forum held at UNCG in November 1967, and more.

We’ll also have coloring pages for the kids and even some doggie treats for any visiting history hounds. HISTORY IS FOR EVERYONE! We hope you’ll join us for this great opportunity to learn more about your local history and archives while enjoying your favorite beer! Baconessence food truck will be at the taproom too, so you can plan to have your dinner as well!

For more information and updates, see the Hop into History Event page on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/events/171257499949673/.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Learning from Medieval Manuscripts



On exhibit in the Hodges Reading room in Jackson Library

“Learning from Medieval Manuscripts”


The University Libraries is fortunate to have in its collections, “Fifty Original Leaves from Medieval Manuscripts.  Western Europe: XII-XVI Century”, a portfolio collection created by Otto F. Ege in the 1940’s, a professor of art history and dean of the Cleveland Institute of Art.  His intent through these portfolios was to provide opportunity for many to view and learn from these individual leaves. 

The selected leaves span through several centuries and across countries, taken from imperfect volumes from Otto Ege’s personal collection.  These manuscripts have provided the university community rare and special opportunities to view first hand historical documents that illustrate a time before mechanical printing was introduced. 

Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives  has made available these medieval manuscripts to university faculty and students through teaching opportunities and research.  Through the years the original storage has become less than perfect.  The preservation division was able to design and create new protective enclosures for these portfolio items to ensure their conservation for the future. 

The exhibit documents the construction of the new enclosures and provides a view of several of the leaves from the collections, presenting some interesting historical facts regarding the creation of medieval manuscripts.


-Audrey Sage


Monday, April 18, 2016

SCUA at Reunion Weekend: Welcoming back the Class of 1966!

On Friday, April 15 as part of the University's Reunion Weekend activities, staff of the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives set up a large exhibit on University history and the University in the 1960s in the Pre-Function Room of the EUC Auditorium. Members of the Class of 1966 were able to reminisce while looking at photographs of former faculty members, gym suits, yearbooks, scrapbooks, and other items from their time on campus. Materials from members of the Class of 1966 who were veterans were also on display.









Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Wondrous Works: Illuminated Manuscripts from Three Continents February 2016 - May 2016

Special Collections and University Archives at UNCG’s University Libraries has mounted an exhibit highlighting the rich tradition of illuminated manuscripts in Europe, India, Persia, Ethiopia, and Armenia.  By presenting these works within a global perspective, the exhibit, Wondrous Works: Illuminated Manuscripts From Three Continents, strives to broaden our understanding of the history of the book, the influence of artistic trends on illuminated works, and the cultural contact and cultural exchange amongst peoples. 

Working with local bookman Norman Smith and his collection of rare works, the exhibit features manuscripts that were created during or shortly after the invention of movable type in 1454.  Despite the wide spread adoption of print technology, the exhibit reveals a continued interest and market for illuminated works well into the 1600s.

The term manuscript comes from the Latin word for “handwritten.”  Before the invention of movable type, all books had to be written out by hand.  It was a time-consuming and labor-intensive process that could take months or years to complete.  Some manuscripts were made even more special by the process of “illumination.”  This term comes from the Latin word for “lit up” or “enlightened” and refers to the use of bright colors and precious metals to embellish initial letters or to portray whole scenes.

The Hodges Reading Room is open to the public from 9 AM - 5 PM, Monday - Friday.

The exhibit closes on May 20, 2016.

- Keith Gorman

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Student Researcher positions with University Archives for 2016-2017 academic year!

Beginning in October 2017, UNCG will be celebrating the 125th anniversary of the opening of the institution as the State Normal and Industrial School. In anticipation of this year-long celebration, many departments and units across campus will be researching their organizational histories and using the resources in University Archives to plan and promote their commemorative events. To assist with these efforts, we will be hiring six student researchers in University Archives during the 2016-2017 academic year.

These positions are only open to undergraduate and graduate students who will be enrolled at UNCG during the Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 semesters. Each student researcher will be expected to work 10-12 hours during the academic year (pay rate is $10 per hour). Preference will be given to students who are able to work the complete academic year (as opposed to just the Fall 2016 semester).

Available positions are:

Archives Researcher (2 positions available; upper level undergraduate or graduate students preferred). The archives researchers will work with departments and units across campus to conduct historical research, add entries to our online encyclopedia, write blog posts on key subjects in university history, select and scan photos for use in other publications/websites, etc. Previous research experience in an archives is welcomed, but not required. A demonstrated interest in history, strong research and writing skills, and the ability to learn quickly are the biggest requirements.

Oral History Researcher (2 positions available; graduate students preferred but upper level undergraduates with an interest in oral history will be considered). The oral history researchers will conduct oral history interviews with key individuals in UNCG's history. These researchers will also conduct preliminary archival research, create transcriptions of interviews, work on indexing existing interviews to enhance access (using OHMS), and create snippets of interviews for use in promotional videos and websites. Previous experience conducting oral history interviews or archival research is strongly desired, but we would consider training the right person. We definitely want these people to have strong communications skills (oral and written) and a keen attention to detail. This person should also be comfortable with learning new technologies.

Exhibits Designer (1 position available; graduate/undergraduate student with an interest in history or exhibits design). The exhibits designer will work with the SCUA staff as well as the other student researchers to develop online and physical exhibits focused on university history. We would strongly prefer a student who is familiar with Photoshop and basic HTML. Previous experience with archival research would be nice, but not required. This position is one that will be collaborating with many others, so an ability to juggle tasks and communicate effectively is necessary.

Marketing and Events Planner (1 position available; graduate/undergraduate student with an interest in communications and marketing). The marketing and events planner will coordinate events and activities aimed at educating current students about university history in fun and innovative ways. This may include working with Student Affairs and other student groups to incorporate university history in existing events. This person will also assist in coordinating social media efforts in University Archives. This position requires strong communications skills (written and oral), strong organizational skills, and an ability to think creatively in order to reach desired groups.


If you are interested in working as a student researcher in the University Archives during the 125th anniversary celebration, email SCUA@uncg.edu, including your resume along with a cover letter that addresses why you are interested in the job. Please be sure to indicate which of the student researcher position or positions you are interested in. Initial application reviews and interviews will take place in late March/early April.

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Act of Establishment Creating UNCG -- 125 Years Ago Today!!

Today marks the 125th anniversary of the passage of the bill that established the State Normal and Industrial School (now UNCG). On February 18, 1891, the General Assembly of North Carolina agreed to fund a "normal" (teaching) school for women. The act appropriated $10,000 per year for maintenance of the school, but did not include any money to support contribution, land, or other facilities costs. In fact, the act stated that "the institution shall be located ... at some suitable place where the citizens thereof shall furnish the necessary buildings of money sufficient to erect them."

Class of 1893, the first graduating class of State Normal
In June 1891, Greensboro was selected as the official site for this new school, making a bid of $30,000 plus a site location. The chairman of the school's founding Board of Directors, Major S.M. Finger, the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, stated, "I congratulate Greensboro on the result. I believe this is the proper place for [the school]. The Piedmont is the coming part of the State."

Stop by Jackson Library between 1pm and 3pm to see a pop-up exhibit featuring the actual charter, the letter received by Charles Duncan McIver naming his as the first president of the school, and many more photographs and other records from the earliest years of UNCG.